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what-is-a-safety-in-football

What is a Safety in Football? (Full Explanation)

ByCoach Martin|Football Basics

While most scores in football games result in a team scoring six points, three points or one point on a play, there are some rare plays that result in two points.

One is a two-point conversion after a touchdown, and the other is a safety.

The safety in football is both a scoring play that results in two points and also the name of a position on defense.

In this article, we’ll be discussing the point-scoring play, not the position.

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What is a Snap Infraction in Football? (Full Explanation)

ByCoach Martin|Football Basics

In football, you’ll sometimes see penalties called before a play even starts — these are what’s know as dead-ball fouls.

Dead-ball fouls can also occur after a play has concluded as well — with many of these being personal foul calls for late hits and the such.

The most common pre-snap dead ball foul is the false start that’s committed by the offense.

But, another one that can happen — but isn’t called as often — is a snap infraction.

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touchback-vs-safety

Touchback vs Safety: What’s the Difference? (Explained)

ByCoach Martin|Football Basics

There are a few plays in football that look similar, but actually have different outcomes — one such comparison is a touchback vs safety.

In both of these plays, a player is either tackled or downed in their own end zone with possession of the football.

On one hand you have a touchback — the team with the football gets an offensive possession started at their own 25-yard line.

On the other hand, a safety — the team with the football not only loses possession of the football altogether, but the opposite team scores 2 points.

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quarterback-sneak

What is a Quarterback Sneak in Football? (Full Explanation)

ByCoach Martin|Football Basics

In short-yardage situations, a football offense will often change their playcalling approach to gain just a yard or two.

On third-and-2, for example, most teams will call plays that have the objective of only gaining those two yards necessary.

Instead of spreading the field out and calling a long passing play, for example, the offense may bring in extra offensive linemen, tight ends and fullbacks to power the ball forward a few yards on the ground.

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pat-football

What is a PAT in Football? (Explained)

ByCoach Martin|Football Basics

If you watch an NFL game, you might think that all touchdowns are worth 7 points.

That’s because in most cases, when a team scores a touchdown, you’ll see their score increase by 7 points.

But, if you’re new to the game of football, what you might not realize is that there are two (2) parts to every touchdown.

When a player crosses the goal line with the ball in his hand, his team scores 6 points.

Then, that team has the opportunity to score one (1) additional point through what’s known as a PAT — or a Point After Touchdown.

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